ASD Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria

The Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) has implemented the Uniform Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Teachers for use across the state of Virginia. The purpose of these standards is to collect data to document teacher performance based on clearly defined expectations. However, the VDOE recognizes that the Uniform Performance Standards may not be the most useful tool for all teachers in all situations. Thus, VCU-ACE has developed the Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Special Education Teachers to assist administrators in their evaluation of the performance of teachers who support students with ASD and other disabilities in public schools.

Performance Standards

Two school employees discussing a document

The Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Special Education Teachers are aligned with the VDOE's Uniform Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Teachers. The Performance Standards include the same seven standards as the VDOE Uniform Performance Standards, however, the indicators of performance differ. The Performance Standards document is available online.

The information gathered from key resources on effective instruction and evidence-based practices for students with ASD and other disabilities was used to develop specific indicators related to effective instruction for students with ASD and other disabilities. The indicators found under each standard in the Performance Standards are based on the following resources:

  • Virginia Autism Council's Skill Competencies for Professionals and Paraprofessionals in Virginia
  • National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders' Autism Program Environment Rating Scale (APERS)
  • Iovannone, Dunlap, Huber, and Kincaid (2003)
  • National Autism Center (2009)
  • National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders (2010)
  • National Resource Council (2001)
  • Simpson (2005)

Companion Rubric

To measure performance, VDOE provided four scoring options for the Uniform Performance Standards: Exemplary, Proficient, Developing/Needs Improvement, and Unacceptable. The Performance Standards utilize these same scoring options. However, to provide guidance and clarity in determining performance, we also created a companion Rubric. The intent of the Rubric is to provide the administrator with specific, observable, and measureable items that could be used to determine the appropriate score for each item. Additionally, the Rubric is intended to provide further clarity to teachers about the expectations of performance. The final column in the Rubric describes where the information needed to determine a score will be found. Information can be found in a variety of places including observation of the teacher and classroom, individualized education program documents (IEPs), lesson plans, data notebooks, and teacher interviews. ThePerformance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Special Education Teachers Rubric is available online.

The two documents are intended to be used together to provide teachers with clear expectations of performance and to provide administrators with a tool to measure teacher performance for students with disabilities.

References

Iovannone, R., Dunlap, G., Huber, H., & Kincaid, D. (2003). Effective educational practices for students with autism spectrum disorders. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 18(3), 150-165.

National Autism Center. (2009). National Standards Report. Randolph, MA: Author.

National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders. (2011). Autism program environment rating scale - preschool/elementary revised. [Assessment].

National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders. (2010). Evidence-based practice briefs. Retrieved from: http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/content/briefs.

National Resource Center. (2001). Educating children with autism. Lord, C. & McGee, J. P. (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Simpson, R. L. (2005). Evidence-based practices and students with autism spectrum disorders. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 20(3), 140-149.

Virginia Autism Council. (2010). Skill competencies for professionals and paraprofessionals in Virginia supporting individuals with autism across the lifespan. Richmond, VA: Author.